Results tagged ‘ Tim Flannery ’

Torres makes things happen; Wild Card musings

OAKLAND — At best, Andres Torres ranks as the Giants’ fourth outfielder. But he moved to the front of the line as a source of the Giants’ success in their 4-1 victory Tuesday night over the Oakland A’s.

Torres coaxed a first-inning walk on Vin Mazzaro’s 3-2 pitch and opened the scoring by rushing home on Pablo Sandoval’s double. Many runners might have held at third base. But third-base coach Tim Flannery, aiming to capitalize on Torres’ speed, waved the speedster home. Sure enough, A’s shortstop Orlando Cabrera’s hurried relay flew high and wide.

“He ignited us,” Giants manager Bruce Bochy said of Torres. “That showed you what speed can do. He plays with a lot of energy, which you love.”

Torres helped seal the victory by making a not-so-routine catch of Adam Kennedy’s fly ball against the wall down the left-field line in foul territory. It ended the seventh inning and stranded two A’s baserunners.

“He probably saved us with that catch,” Bochy said.

Torres’ grab propelled Tim Lincecum to his complete-game victory. “I thought he was going to run into the wall, which he did, but it was nice the ball stayed in the playing field,” Lincecum said of Torres’ grab. “I was as pumped as anybody else.”

Torres, who wouldn’t boast about his skills if you paid him, explained that common sense helped him make the play on Kennedy’s fly. Kennedy, said Torres, had been trying to hit the ball to the opposite field all evening — probably a wise ploy against Lincecum. So, said Torres, “I tried to play that way a little bit.”

Encountering the wall didn’t concern Torres in the least. “I was just trying to catch the ball,” he said.

*****

I was all set to devote a sentence or two in my game wrapup to the Giants staying ahead in the National League Wild Card race. First, however, while waiting to interview Lincecum in the Giants clubhouse, I heard a player watch a televised sports report — I couldn’t tell which network was airing it — that trumpeted the Wild Card standings. This player shook his head in mild disgust. “Five years from now they’ll be talking about the Wild Card in April,” he told the Giant sitting next to him.

Translation: It’s far too early to make a big deal about the Wild Card. So I opted not to contribute to the hype.

I’ll occasionally mention it in the near future, though. It’s relevant to monitor, since the Giants’ position likely will influence what general manager Brian Sabean does or doesn’t do before the July 31 trade deadline. But getting overly worked up about it and delivering twice-daily updates is probably premature.

– Chris Haft 

 

nsing that aware of d the game’s first run e

One final Zimmerman item; thoughts on Renteria (and Frandsen)

SAN FRANCISCO — Giants third-base coach Tim Flannery delivered the final word on the 30-game hitting streak that ended for Washington’s Ryan Zimmerman on Wednesday. Well, maybe you could choose from more than one word. Such as “classy.” Or “impressive.”

Zimmerman grounded into a force play in the ninth inning to end an 0-for-3 afternoon. Up came the Giants, trailing 6-2. Thursday, Flannery related that he approached Zimmerman, who was playing third base, before the bottom of the ninth and said, “We’re going to score four, tie this thing up and get you a chance to hit again.”

Zimmerman’s response, according to Flannery, was, “At this point, I’d rather take the win.”

Flannery was bowled over by Zimmerman’s selflessness. “Think about that,” he said. “How many guys would do that?”

*****

Should Edgar Renteria’s hamstring injury force him onto the 15-day disabled list, it’s tempting to assume that Kevin Frandsen would be recalled from Triple-A Fresno to fill the roster spot.

However, Juan Uribe is perfectly capable of starting at shortstop short-term. As much as many people want to see Frandsen back in San Francisco, he’d go to waste sitting on the bench behind Uribe and second baseman Emmanuel Burriss.

Unless, of course, the Giants’ braintrust decides that it wants Frandsen, who has played some shortstop at Triple-A, to handle the position instead of Uribe while Renteria mends. Otherwise, the Giants could call up just about anybody.

Many others would like to see first baseman Jesus Guzman get a shot. But he’s another guy who’d go to waste on the bench and should ascend to San Francisco only if he’s going to play more than semi-regularly.

*****

The note about Sergio Romo was filed shortly before he made his injury rehabilitation debut for Class A San Jose at Visalia. He pitched a scoreless inning, walking one and striking out one. Expect Romo back soon.

– Chris Haft

 

Good news & a surprise for Giants’ Flannery

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. — Being the bearer of good news was nice. But in this case, it also was a little unsettling.

Saturday, I congratulated Giants third-base coach Tim Flannery on being named to the Rancho Cucamonga Quakes’ Hall of Fame, which I learned when a co-worker forwarded me a MiLB.com story on the subject. I also wanted to ask Flannery a few questions about it for either a short article or a blog entry like this one.

Flannery just stared at me. “I had not heard anything about it,” he said.

Well, now he knows. For the record, Flannery’s 1994 Quakes club finished 77-59 — despite, as he told me, losing their first 11 games of the second half. He said that they collected back-to-back hits only once during that stretch. “We thought it was going to be a tough, long summer,” Flannery said.

Flannery’s club, which won the only California League championship in Quakes history, included Derrek Lee, who was part of Rancho Cucamonga’s charter HOF class in 2007.  “He grew into a man that season,” Flannery said of the future Chicago Cubs All-Star first baseman.

Lee, then 18, played third base that year. “He could pick it,” Flannery said. “That’s why he’s such a great first baseman.”

– Chris Haft

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 101 other followers